ADINA

ANDRUS

From: Bucharest, Romania

Based in: New York, US

Born: 1980

Main Artistic Themes: Human experience

Web: adinaandrus.com

Andrus' work is centered around shared human experiences - from psychological commonalities to cultural signs and symbols throughout history that have served as means of communication. 

 

She uses mixed media for its capacity to reach beyond the visual, to a more tactile process and overall experience.

Good Neighbor
Ignis
Path #3
Path #2
Path #1
Sparkling Heart
Broken Heart
Baby on Board
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ABOUT THE ARTIST

Andrus' work is centered around shared human experiences - from psychological commonalities to cultural signs and symbols throughout history that have served as means of communication.

 

The images in her pieces purposefully provide a way for her to discover the common threads that unite us and to trigger a pre-verbal recollection of the collective subconscious. Oftentimes, these images relate, more of less directly, to primitive visual expression: stylized depictions of the figure, imagery used in religious rituals, time-worn rudimentary shapes.


Andrus uses mixed media for its capacity to reach beyond the visual, to a more tactile process and overall experience. She invites the viewer to come closer and observe the ridges, cracks, strings, textures and pigment, like maps that suggest and hint at layers of meaning. 

Selected Exhibitions

The MAAC

Group Show: Mortal Coil

2017

New York, NY

Spectrum Gallery

Group Show: See Me, Feel Me

2017

Centerbrook, CT

 Gatherings

Gatherings

"Gatherings" explores people's interactions through a survey of art history. The paintings included in this series are re-interpretations of works of art from around the world, depicting humans getting together in a variety of settings, with a variety of purposes.

 

The main objective, beyond the "mash-up" quality, is to show how similar these interactions are once we look past the specific time and location that they are associated with. The silhouettes used to depict humans are borrowed from prehistoric figurines found at Cucuteni, Romania: simplified, essential human forms.

The series includes 30 pieces, each labeled with the location and approximate year when the original piece was created.